Posts Tagged ‘Maine trust lawyers’

Big changes in Maine and federal estate tax

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

by Sally M. Wagley, estate planning and elder law attorney

 Everything in life changes – especially the law on estate tax.

Since I started practicing as an estate planning lawyer in Maine almost 14 years ago, estate tax laws have changed many times.   This last year, 2011, has been particularly eventful:

  •  The federal estate and gift tax exemption increased from $3.5 million to $5 million dollars (after a very brief period during which the federal estate tax was repealed altogether).  
  • The Maine estate tax exemption will increase from $1 million to $2 million dollars, effective January 1, 2013.   

 If you are a Maine resident and have accumulated significant wealth, a simple will may not be enough. You may need an estate plan which aims to reduce or even eliminate estate tax, thus preserving what you’ve saved for the next generation or for charity.  Strategies  include: 

  •  Trusts for the benefit of spouse, children, grandchildren or other family members;
  •  Gifts to charity, including gifts to charitable trusts;
  •  Bequests which skip a generation;
  •  Annual gifts of up to $13,000 per person to family members;
  •  Funding college savings plans for grandchildren. 

Since the laws on estate tax change so often (and will continue to change), I like to incorporate flexibility into clients’ estate plans, enabling surviving family members to make decisions at the time of your death based on the law in effect at that time, based on the size of your estate and based on th e needs of surviving family members.   An example is a will which gives your surviving spouse the ability to “disclaim” his or her inheritance from you, directing assets to one or more tax-saving trusts, if it appears at that time to be beneficial.    This is just one of a number of approaches to formulating a tax-oriented estate plan.

The information provided here is for educational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice or an answer to a specific legal problem. 

Sally M. Wagley practices in the areas of elder law,  estate planning and estate administration, with the firm of Levey and Wagley, P.A. in Winthrop, Maine, www.leveyandwagley.com.   

Trusts 101

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Clients frequently come into my law office asking “Should I (or we) have a trust?”  My answer is always “It depends on your situation and what your goals are.” 

Then I ask clients, “What are your goals?   What are the concerns you have that make you think about having a trust?”   These concerns may include:

  • Providing for a minor or young adult child
  • Providing for a disabled person
  • Providing for a pet
  • Avoiding probate
  • Minimizing estate tax
  • Preserving your assets against the high cost of nursing home care
  • Keeping your vacation home in the family.

There are many different types of trusts, for many different purposes:

  • A trust for a minor or young adult child;
  • A “special needs trust” for a disabled person;
  • A trust for the care of an animal;
  • A revocable living trust, to avoid probate;
  • A tax-oriented trust, to reduce estate taxes;
  • A trust to preserving your assets against the high cost of nursing home care;
  • A trust to hold your vacation home for the benefit of your family.

In the coming weeks, I will write about different types of trusts which can be useful depending on the client’s situation. Later this week:  Trusts for minor or young adult children.

 


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