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Americans of All Ages Are Creating Wills During Covid-19

Posted by Daniel J. Eccher Esq. | Sep 30, 2020 | 0 Comments

There has been an explosion in the numbers of Americans rushing to make their will online. Understandably, the coronavirus pandemic has created the scramble to set up wills and end-of-life-directives. However, online do it yourself (DIY) wills are often deemed invalid as they do not comply with all of the legal requirements of your state. According to Caring.com, the prevalence of will and estate planning has been on the decline since 2017 but this trend is quickly reversing itself with the advent of the coronavirus pandemic.

So, who needs a will? Ask yourself if you care who gets your property or money if you die? If you have minor children, do you care who will act as their legal guardian? The answer is anyone married, anyone with children or anyone with assets needs a properly executed will. Wills are governed by state law. Your will should reflect your wishes in the language and format required by the state in which you live for it to be valid.

Many law offices are turning to teleconference with their clients to address social distancing protocols while still providing legal services such as writing a will. Businesses like Zoom are experiencing a quadrupling of daily users. Part of this significant increase includes hosting secure attorney/client meetings for will preparations. The importance of an attorney guiding you through the process of creating a will cannot be understated as they understand the nuances of how things need to be written. Once your will is complete, it must be correctly notarized as mistakes made in the will-signing process can potentially invalidate your will.  Your attorney will guide you through the signing process, and could involve signing during a video conference.

Beyond the creation of a will, many Americans are increasingly concerned about their powers of attorney and advanced health care directives (aka, living wills). These documents, which are active while you are alive, are equally as important as your will. Named Personal Representatives, successors, beneficiaries, and agents under power of attorney should have several back-up representatives as the mortality rate due to the coronavirus remains unknown. 

According to research in a recent New York Times report, health care workers are more likely to contract COVID-19 than the average person. During this pandemic, many doctors and other medical professionals are rushing to have their wills drawn up. In addition to doctors, anyone on the front lines in the fight against COVID 19, from hospital custodians to nurses to EMS responders, should either make a will or review and possibly update their existing one. However, the truth is no matter what your profession or likelihood of contracting this virus, you should have a properly executed will during this time of considerable uncertainty.

There are few things you can act on during the COVID-19 pandemic that can bring you assurance and a sense of relief. The legal preparation of your will and advanced directives is an action you can take that protects you and your family. We can help. Call us at (207) 377-6966 or message us through the "Contact" page of our website to schedule a phone or video conference, and we'll get this importance process started for you. 

About the Author

Daniel J. Eccher Esq.

Daniel J. Eccher, Esq. is the Managing Shareholder at Levey, Wagley, Putman & Eccher, P.A., in Winthrop, Maine. Dan's favorite problem to solve is helping clients figure out how to afford long-term care while having something left for their family.

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Our office is in Winthrop, Maine, located approximately 10 miles from Augusta, and 17 miles from Lewiston. We are also available by appointment to meet in the Brunswick/Topsham area and the Waterville area.